grammar and word formation rules: in which I go meh

This is a facebook post that I’m editing a teeny bit then pasting. I way overused my right hand with mindless clicking yesterday*, without realizing how long I’d been doing it, so it’s too sore for proper writing/editing. Also I desperately need a manicure because I can’t cut my own nails because of the RA, so I’m fingernail-typoing too much.

Here, ctrl-v:

The monstrous indecency of hybrid etymology | Sentence first http://owl.li/PlM7x

Sabrina sent me a link to this tshirt.

polyamory_is_wrong_tshirt
(“Polyamory is wrong. It’s either Multiamory or Polyphilia, but mixing Greek and Latin roots? Wrong.”)

I knew there was a big stack of other hybrids, so I googled and got that excellent blog post.

I think this is relevant to tendinitis/tendonitis, too; we tend to want to follow old rules, or some of us do. I’m still partial to tendinitis in part because I’ve always spelled it that way, but also, retroactively, because it arises from an industry that tends to use Latin.

I accept that folks want extraversion to conform to introversion, so are spelling it extroversion, which is now an acceptable variant, but I’ll still spell it extraversion.

I know people who still italicize and accent “resume” because it’s French. Except, like kayak and taco and boss, it’s English now, and thus doesn’t demand italicization. (Resumé makes sense to me to avoid confusion with the verb resume, but less so the French résumé.)

I “split” (though not really) infinitives because Latinists told us we shouldn’t, as an infinitive counts as a single word. Sure it does, in Latin, Spanish, French — but in English, it’s two. Or rather, it’s still one with “to” as its marker.

Relevant links:
http://goo.gl/BJFPcG
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/extravert
http://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-culture/most-of-what-you-think-you-know-about-grammar-is-wrong-4047445/?no-ist

*I hadn’t gone through my twitter following list to cull inactive, resold, baby-related, or otherwise unnecessary accounts in ages.

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